Fuji X-T2 | Fuji 16mm 1.4

ISO 200 | f1.8 | 1/160 + 2nd Exposure 1SO 4000 | F2 | 1/80

Preset : DVLOP Jose Villa Film pack 

To plenty of wedding photographers, the idea of shooting a wedding in some caves would be a challenge too far. For others, Like Euan Robertson, that’s a challenge he would happily rise to. Even from his sick bed! There will be days for all of us when you are unwell and would love to ‘phone in sick’ but of course, the couple are relying on you to show up. So I have huge admiration for Euan, not only working through severe back pain but also being creative enough to produce this gorgeous image. It has bags of atmosphere and romance and must be greatly treasured by the couple.

Read below for Euan’s Story Behind The Shot …

What Euan says ...

“I almost never shot this wedding. The night before, I was face down on the floor, my back in pain I’d never known before. Thanks to some super-intense painkillers (c/o my wonderful mother-in-law) and a heroic last-minute second shooting offer from Lindsey of Mack Photography, I somehow pulled it off. 

The Caves, as the names suggests, is a pretty dark venue. Just what you need when you’re floating on sedatives! It has lots of decorative, but not very functional light that make it look beautiful, but tricky to shoot. The couple had told me they’d booked this venue because they loved the atmosphere of the venue, so I was keen to reflect that in their photos. 
I almost always shoot some blurred lights during wedding days in case the chance for a double exposure comes up. These lights lined an archway leading to the ceremony room and, with the patch of light where they stood to be married at the vanishing point, it looked pretty perfect. Lindsey stood in for a bunch of lighting checks to line this up (Fuji cameras are rubbish for in-camera double exposure shooting!) before we nabbed the couple for a few minutes before the first dance. 
The final alignment & overlay was done in photoshop and that was then processed with the Jose Villa pack from DVLOP as a starting point, with lots of saturation shifts to make the lights pop a little more.”